In theory, the marriage between Thomas Tuchel and Bayern Munich seemed great. Despite managing Borussia Dortmund, Tuchel and Bayern seemed like a great fit. 

The German’s two previous stints saw him quickly fall out with the crowds, dressing room, and the management board. Still, arguably, this could be attributed to the volatile environments of Paris Saint-Germain and Chelsea. 

Hell, the German even won the Champions League against Pep Guardiola’s Manchester City with The Blues. However, it was not enough; soon enough, Tuchel was booted out of London. 

He remained jobless until Bayern seized the opportunity, sacking the just-acquired Julian Nagelsmann mid-season. The new gem – Thomas Tuchel. By booting Nagelsmann out, Bayern thought they found a ‘new project’ in Tuchel. But there’s bad news: his appointment was a mistake if not a blunder.

Mismatched Expectations and Tactical Decisions

A reminder of the situation – Flick won the Champions League in the dreaded pandemic year but could not replicate the success later on. Though both Nagelsmann and Tuchel are brilliant coaches, their fundamentals are completely different and, therefore, require different players. 

Bayern spent loads to lure Nagelsmann to the Bavarian capital, having to pay his release clause. It should have been the beginning of a new era. However, impatience and greed led Bayern to the decision to replace Nagelsmann with Tuchel. Which is not bad, but the squad’s harmony and development trajectory consequently took a toll. 

To this day, Bayern’s best player – Joshua Kimmich – is at war with the club for the repeated negative portrayals in the media. At the same time, Bayern wasn’t able to bolster the midfield support around their linchpin. Bayern is full of gems and has gone chopping wood instead. 

This is a major problem. In the previous decade, Bayern was renowned as a club with great strategy, stability, and little drama. But since Flick’s exit, the contrast could not be starker. 

Internal Conflicts and Transfer Missteps

The club’s transfer strategy has also come under scrutiny. The transfer of Sadio Mané

was hardly understandable, and the exit of Benjamin Pavard has further unsettled the defensive setup, leaving Bayern’s backline vulnerable.

Kimmich is regularly sacrificed in front of the media and is the scapegoat after every Bayern disaster. Some even say he’s become too arrogant. On the other hand, Sané and Gnabry have barely shown any progress during Tuchel’s reign, a worrying sign. 

Bayern even realized the high-profile acquisition of Harry Kane, one of the best strikers in the world. And still, Bayern plays as eleven players instead of a team. What was once Bayern’s major strength has been abandoned to the profit of isolated individuals.

Tuchel, on his end, can only blame himself. Sure, he did not get Palhinha – in whom the club did show interest but failed to acquire. Even so, Tuchel has made tactical decisions that have perplexed fans and pundits, especially regarding the wings. 

It becomes increasingly harder to understand how Bayern are playing and to find a way to extract consistent positive outcomes. It becomes truly worrying with experiments like placing Mazraoui on the opposite wing. Another example is the insistence on acquiring English defender Eric Dier, which fits the wider context. 

In many ways, it feels like Tuchel wasn’t made for Bayern. Tuchel usually fits better into a rising side, noticeable with his pressing techniques, as he did with Chelsea when winning the Champions League. But with Bayern, it just did not feel right, leaving a bitter taste after the abandoned Nagelsmann project. 

Tuchel, culturally, is not at home in Munich. It is not his home. And it will never be. Just yesterday, the club announced that the two parties will be calling it quits at the end of the season.

Tuchel needs specific conditions to thrive- or he will fall out with the CEO or other board members, as happened during all his previous stints. Even at Dortmund – he eventually fell out with Watzke. It highlights a recurring challenge in Tuchel’s career: the delicate art of managing relationships within a football club’s hierarchy and squad.

Recently, the German tabloid BILD claimed that Bayern’s locker room is split regarding Tuchel’s leadership, showing the divisive nature of his tenure. A reason could be that he isolated many to the profit of ‘the others’. 

However, it’s mildly infuriating that Tuchel struggles with communication and relationship management after so many years, as suggested by repeated fallouts across different clubs. It seems he never actually learns from his mistakes. All of which have been largely avoidable. 

The Road Ahead for Bayern Munich

If Bayern wants to relaunch itself, it needs to re-establish its former scouting approach. It shows that, in theory, the crop is great.

Of course, there is a lack of pivot to support Kimmich, but that’s it. However, Bayern currently functions by managers, hiring one and sacking the other. The club needs to show more patience, understanding, and strategic alignment with the club’s values and long-term vision. 

Moving forward, Bayern must navigate the balance between the ambitious pursuit of success and the nurturing of a cohesive, unified club culture.


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